• UPM's FIRSTCUT+® Processing Services

    Our FIRSTCUT+® Processing Services include cut-to-length, slitting, edging, chamgering & facing, shearing, laser cutting, laser gauge measurement, water jet cutting, plasma cutting, sawing, precision cold saw cutting, precision blanks, first stage machining, heat treating, ultra-sonic testing, boring, trepanning, and deburring. Take a look at our latest video highlighting the FIRSTCUT+® Processing Services featured by United Performance Metals. If you have additional questions, don't hesitate to contact our sales team at sales@upmet.com . To view our new video on UPM's FIRSTCUT+® Processing...
  • Safety Topic: Got Water?

    In summer weather and other hot, humid working conditions, drinking enough water is vital to preventing heat illness. The most serious illness, heat stroke, can be fatal. It occurs when the body’s cooling system fails because of moisture and minerals lost to sweating. To prevent heat illness under hot work conditions make sure you stay hydrated. If possible, try to stay out of the sun. Take breaks when you can and drink water frequently. Don’t drink a large quantity of water at once, just keep on sipping. Drinking enough water helps keep the body’s digestive and elimination systems working...
  • UPM Has a “Nose” for Helping Kids!

    On this special occasion, staff members of United Performance Metals put on a happy face…and a big, red nose. Red Nose Day began in 1988 as a fundraiser to end child poverty around the world. To date, Red Nose Day has raised over $1 billion globally. Celebrated in the United States on May 25 th , funds raised support programs in all 50 states and in some of the poorest communities in Latin America, Asia and Africa. These projects ensure kids are safe, healthy, educated, and empowered. In 2016, 2,659,642 children’s lives were directly impacted through a program supported by the initiative,...
  • Safety Topic: Treat That Cut

    The shelves of drugstores and supermarkets are loaded with a variety of bandages and other first aid items, so it’s surprising how many people still get infections from untreated wounds. Small cuts and abrasions can be the start of something big, so they shouldn’t be ignored. They require immediate attention. It’s hard to visualize the number of germs, some of them deadly, that are often on our skin and on the things we work with. These germs are just waiting to find an opening in the skin to enter the body and start trouble. When cuts occur, treat them right away. Don’t wait until break time...
  • Safety Topic: Spring Cleaning Safety

    As the weather starts to change many homeowners start to think about spring cleaning. Here are some safety tips: Household and pool chemicals, paints, and poisons should be properly marked and stored under lock and key, away from children’s reach. Dispose of any that are leaking, expired, or that look bad. When cleaning up hazardous chemicals wear rubber gloves and follow the safety directions on the packaging. Never mix chemicals in the same container if you don’t know how to dispose of them, seek outside advice. Never put them into the trash or pour down the drain. Make sure gasoline and...
  • Safety Topic: Lift It Twice

    Most of you have heard the general rules of safe lifting. Remember to “Get a firm grip on the load, keep it close, bend at the knees, use your legs to lift the load, and keep your spine in the natural position (with an arch in your lower back).” These principles always apply and should be incorporated into every lift-if possible! Given the enormous number of “risky” lifting situations that most of us are faced with at the work place, you may not be able to apply these principles every time. This is why you must always remember to LIFT IT TWICE! The act of lifting is the same as any other...
  • Safety Topic: Pushing Safety

    On occasion or perhaps even every day, we're called on to push something. Typically it's safer to push than it is to pull a load; however doing either can be dangerous to your body. Many soft tissue injuries occur because we push or pull unsafely. Specific techniques are helpful to use when you have to push on something. How we push a load is critical. We need to ensure we have good posture when we’re exerting that type of force. Most of us can develop higher push forces by leaning our body weight into the load. For pushing, your hands should be between your elbow and hip. Square up to the...
  • Safety Topic: Overconfidence

    It's good you feel confident about your job. You take pride in your ability to do your work quickly and well. However, there is such a thing as overconfidence - when you forget about the hazards and fail to use safe work practices. No matter how long you have been on the job, and no matter how skilled you, are you must remember the basic safety precautions. Don't be overconfident! All workplaces and tasks have certain hazards and risks. As an experienced worker, you can still become entangled in a saw if you wear loose clothing, and a cut piece of metal is just as heavy when it falls. How do...
  • Safety Topic: You and Safety Awareness

    Safety Awareness is like almost everything else we do . . . it is learned, not instinctive. We aren’t born with awareness for safety concerns. We learn through various means. Some learn by doing, others by watching and some by reading. Others learn by their mistakes or the mistakes of others, which is one of the most important reasons near miss reporting is so imperative. Below are some good examples of behaviors that suggest you have good safety awareness: Before you begin a job, you consider how to do it more safely. You make sure you know how and when to use personal protective equipment....
  • Safety Topic: Slips, Trips and Falls - Winter Safety Tips

    Slips, trips and falls are the number one reason for an industrial injury in the United States. Below are some tips for walking outside when it is cold and snowy or icy: Plan ahead and give yourself sufficient time. When walking on steps always use the hand railings and plant your feet firmly on each step. When walking on an icy or snow-covered walkway, take short steps and walk at a slower pace so you can react quickly to a change in traction. Bending your knees a little and taking slower and shorter steps increases traction and can greatly reduce your chances of falling. It also helps to...