• Safety Topic: Lift It Twice

    Most of you have heard the general rules of safe lifting. Remember to “Get a firm grip on the load, keep it close, bend at the knees, use your legs to lift the load, and keep your spine in the natural position (with an arch in your lower back).” These principles always apply and should be incorporated into every lift-if possible! Given the enormous number of “risky” lifting situations that most of us are faced with at the work place, you may not be able to apply these principles every time. This is why you must always remember to LIFT IT TWICE! The act of lifting is the same as any other...
  • Safety Topic: Pushing Safety

    On occasion or perhaps even every day, we're called on to push something. Typically it's safer to push than it is to pull a load; however doing either can be dangerous to your body. Many soft tissue injuries occur because we push or pull unsafely. Specific techniques are helpful to use when you have to push on something. How we push a load is critical. We need to ensure we have good posture when we’re exerting that type of force. Most of us can develop higher push forces by leaning our body weight into the load. For pushing, your hands should be between your elbow and hip. Square up to the...
  • Safety Topic: Overconfidence

    It's good you feel confident about your job. You take pride in your ability to do your work quickly and well. However, there is such a thing as overconfidence - when you forget about the hazards and fail to use safe work practices. No matter how long you have been on the job, and no matter how skilled you, are you must remember the basic safety precautions. Don't be overconfident! All workplaces and tasks have certain hazards and risks. As an experienced worker, you can still become entangled in a saw if you wear loose clothing, and a cut piece of metal is just as heavy when it falls. How do...
  • Safety Topic: You and Safety Awareness

    Safety Awareness is like almost everything else we do . . . it is learned, not instinctive. We aren’t born with awareness for safety concerns. We learn through various means. Some learn by doing, others by watching and some by reading. Others learn by their mistakes or the mistakes of others, which is one of the most important reasons near miss reporting is so imperative. Below are some good examples of behaviors that suggest you have good safety awareness: Before you begin a job, you consider how to do it more safely. You make sure you know how and when to use personal protective equipment....
  • Safety Topic: Slips, Trips and Falls - Winter Safety Tips

    Slips, trips and falls are the number one reason for an industrial injury in the United States. Below are some tips for walking outside when it is cold and snowy or icy: Plan ahead and give yourself sufficient time. When walking on steps always use the hand railings and plant your feet firmly on each step. When walking on an icy or snow-covered walkway, take short steps and walk at a slower pace so you can react quickly to a change in traction. Bending your knees a little and taking slower and shorter steps increases traction and can greatly reduce your chances of falling. It also helps to...
  • Safety Topic: Four Elements of Combustion

    Any program on fire prevention and safety is based on a clear understanding of how materials ignite. In order for a fire to occur, four elements are required; Oxygen, Heat, Fuel and Chain Reaction. The elements of combustion are very similar to the construction of a tetrahedron: All triangular components must come together before a fire can occur. Therefore, the goal of a fire safety program is to keep these elements apart. Since oxygen is present in nearly all-industrial work situations we must separate or control the heat and fuel sources to reduce the chances of a chain reaction. Take a...
  • Supporting Wigs for Kids

    For over 30 years, Wigs for Kids has been providing Hair Replacement Systems and support for children who have lost their hair due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, Alopecia, Trichotillomania, burns and other medical issues at no cost to children or their families. UPM Supply Chain Associate, Ben Randall, recently supported Wigs for Kids by donating a very long portion of his hair to the organization. Ben shared his inspiration for getting involved with Wigs for Kids. “When my aunt was diagnosed with cancer and underwent chemotherapy treatment, I was inspired to do something to help.” “I...
  • A Shout Out to Our Big Sister!

    Today’s all access, hyper-paced world brings upon us a barrage of work, emails, social obligations and time commitments each and every day. With so much information coming at us, along with personal and family responsibilities, it’s easy to overlook a message, a daily chore or even an appointment. Families are juggling so much at one time, the “ball” will inevitably be dropped every now and then. But what happens when we are so overwhelmed, that we overlook a child? In tough times like these, when it becomes challenging to meet our children’s needs on a consistent basis, many families look for...
  • Congratulations to the Scholarship Recipients of 2016!

    We’re pleased to announce this year’s scholarship recipients: Joseph Bunton, Son of Steve Bunton who holds an operations position for United Performance Metals and Chris Ivers, son of Marjorie Ivers, who holds a sales position for Vulcanium, a specialty division of United Performance Metals. Joseph is pictured with his parents, Steve and Michelle Bunton and Tom Kennard, President of United Performance Metals. Joseph plans to attend The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and major in Anthropology this fall. Chris is pictured with Jerry St. Clair, President of Vulcanium. Chris is a rising...
  • UPM Putting the "Tough" in Tough Mudder

    Here at UPM, we challenge our employees to jump out of their comfort zones, even if that means diving into a big pile of mud! On June 11 th 2016, 17 of our UPM employees and 16 families/friends of UPM, making a total of 33 participants (Wow!), completed the 2016 Tough Mudder Kentucky challenge consisting of an 11-mile race and 20 different obstacle courses. Some of the courses included huge mud pits, climbing over 12 foot wooden walls, and even running (and screaming) through an electric shock therapy pit! Now that’s tough! Waist Deep in Teamwork...and Mud The Tough Mudder “emphasizes teamwork...